Brew Day – Hop Dump 1.0 – 10/21/18

The idea behind Hop Dump is to empty out your fridge, and use whatever hops you have before they become unfresh. I spent the AM measuring out what I had left, and then when Baby Breaking took his AM siesta, I sat down at the computer and designed a beer. Once BB woke up, we went to the beer supply store. This will a cheap batch (relatively) since I only needed to buy the grain and the yeast.

I targeted an Imperial IPA right off the bat because I knew this was going to be a high IBU beer. Between that and the hellacious amount of dry hopping I’m going to do, I wanted a nice alcohol backbone to level out the taste. If I hit my fermentation numbers, this will be around 9%. That is what I had in mind.

I’m looking forward to the first sample draw next week. I put sampling spouts on my 2 gallon fermenters to make gravity readings easier (I was tired of popping the lids and introducing oxygen into the mix). Isn’t it funny how the stupid simple things like that can bring you joy?

Equipment upgrade side note for my kegging system…

I decided to buy a two port secondary regulator to help me do independent carbonation controls on my two kegs. The CO2 tank runs through the primary regulator which is jacked up to 30 psi. The first tap (El Hefe) has the regulator set at 9 psi. Very nice pour. The 2nd tap (Chicory Dry Irish Stout) is force carbing at 25 psi. I can’t emphasize how nice it is to have the ability to control carbonation separately based on the beer. It really makes the experience of pouring so much better. If you have multiple taps, I HIGHLY recommend you set up to have a regulator for each. It really isn’t that expensive. Here is a link to the one I got. Notice that it has a hose barb for the “IN.” You need this to connect from the hose coming off your primary regulator. Don’t make the mistake of purchasing a multiple tap PRIMARY regulator.

The Recipe:

Hop dump.JPG

I included the bottom style guide comparison to show how BeerSmith can help you design a recipe from scratch. As you can see, I was targeting an Imperial IPA style, and I’m within the target range for IBU and SRM. I was most concerned about IBU’s (since that can absolutely kill a beer if you screw it up). I messed with a couple different configurations on the “bittering hops” and settled on an addition at 60 minutes, and a couple at 10 minutes.

Brew notes (I’m not going to regurgitate all of the steps – just the ones that are important):

  • 75 minute mash
  • 60 minute boil
  • Northern brewer @ 60 min
  • Sorachi Ace and East Kent Goldings @ 10 min
  • Dry hop the rest after a week of fermenting

Target numbers:

  • Pre boil SG: 1.070
    • nailed it – 1.075
  • 1.5 gallons
    • needed to top off to hit 1.5 gallons (too vigorous a boil I guess)
  • OG – 1.089 , FG – 1.027
    • Killed the OG (1.094)

This will be bottled once it reaches its final gravity.

Bought ingredients at my local homebrew store (Bacchus & Barleycorn).

Brew day notes:

  • Date: 10/20/18
  • Stovetop BIAB setup (used nylon paint straining bag)
  • Total time (including cleaning): 4 hours
  • Brew day beer of choice:
    • Homebrew – Blueberry Stout
  • Brew day A/V stylings of choice:
    • Arrested Development – season 4 on Netflix
  • Actual OG: 1.094
  • Final OG: 1.034
  • Final ABV: 8.3%
  • What went well: new thermometer gave me a sense of security that I wasn’t destroying my mash
  • What went bad: nothing really
  • Fermentation notes:
    • 10/21 – airlock has some activity (part of me is wondering if I should have made a starter since this was a high gravity beer). But, Beersmith didn’t say one was needed – as long as I rehydrated my S-04, one packet for this volume should do the trick. We’ll see.
    • 10/27 – gravity at 1.034 – will add dry hops today and check again in a week. Its within 7 points of its potential final, so that is not too bad. Sample taste is very sweet with a little bitter. Not a lot of hop aroma – that is the dry hop job!
    • 11/4 – cold crashed and bottled
  • Tasting notes (sample taken pre-bottling bucket, so its not carbonated, and is 60 degrees)
    • Full body and good mouthfeel. Definitely some bitterness, but the sweet tries to balance it out. Definitely some strong hop aroma going on here. There is too much going on to be able to isolate different hops. That is probably not a surprise since there are more than 5 different hops in this thing.

 

Have you ever brewed this style beer before? Please let us know about your brewing experiences. If you enjoyed this post, please like and share. Thanks!

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